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First Impressions of Spotify

spotify 300x208 First Impressions of SpotifyAs many of us music lovers may have realized by now, Spotify has entered the US. Spotify is a DRM-based music streaming service. Spotify, instantly gives me a flashback to my days of Napster. It has similar qualities, although the look is different, and they are also taking a different approach. Spotify requires no downloading, and your favorite song is just a click away. Instantly, I notice some pro’s and cons of using Spotify.

After submitting my email, a few days later I got invite. I am glad that I waited, since I almost immediately purchased the Pro version. I usually like to try out the products I am using before I make any purchase, especially when it comes to music applications. Spotify was an easy download, doesn’t seem to affect my computer too much, and has a nice looking icon that sits in my dock. The design looks like a mixture between old school Napster, and iTunes. Overall, I think it looks good. It is very simple to navigate, and I pretty much picked up on the all features within a few minutes. The best part about Spotify is the immense library they have to offer. You can search virtually any song you can think of, and start  playing instantly. Of course this music is streaming, so you do not worry about download times and taking up space on your computer with large libraries of music. Spotify will actually load all of your music stored in local files as an extenuation of your music listening experience. Very cool! Spotify lets you have your own library and if you are feeling sick of your own music, with the click of a button you can have virtually any song that you like. This makes Spotify a very dynamic music program. More →

British Tory party to hijack Spotify appealing for votes

spotify logo 300x225 British Tory party to hijack Spotify appealing for votesBritish political parties are definitely looking to use the Internet more in the run up to next year’s general election, but I’m not sure how welcome a mudslinging appeal on popular streaming music service Spotify is going to be.

Due to Spotify’s immense success, particularly among younger people for whom politics is, generally, a complete turnoff, the Conservative Party will launch chairman Eric Pickles onto the service to attack the Labour Party and then say something along the lines of “hey, we’re really nice people really, vote for us!”.

In fact, his 45 second address will begin:

“With Spotify, you only listen to the stuff you want to hear, right? Well sorry to spoil your day but here’s something you don’t want to hear.”

Yes, Mr Pickles. You.

More →

MP3Tunes Founder declares online music streaming death

In a guest post for Techcrunch the founder of MP3.com and MP3Tunes, Michael Robertson, declares the actual online music streaming climate death.

The music selling and radio business is increasingly being commoditized. Profits are being squeezed to the point of unsustainability. This spells pending doom for imeem, Pandora, Myspace Music, Slacker and the newest entrant Spotify unless there is an industry-upheaving royalty rate change.

After analyzing both the massively hyped Spotify and the under Best Buy rebooted Napster he mentions that most similar sites, such as Pandora and MySpace Music, so far have failed in making a paid subscription model a viable solution. Music streaming services world wide are living a hard time and UK-based, but CBS owned Last.fm also switched to a compulsory subscription for users outside of the US, UK and Germany because so far they have failed to monetize ads sufficiently in other pats of world.

These may seem dire times, but unless streaming platforms can become more global, it seems that they will struggle to sell ANY real advertising at all and if, the question is will it be sufficient to pay royalties and the rather high wages developers benefit in startups.

Read the complete TC entry here.

Spotify to offer 320kb/s Ogg Vorbis support

Much hyped music-streaming service Spotify has announced in the support forums that they will be rolling out CD quality streaming for premium users.

This is a new feature that we will be rolling out later this week. We will offer premium subscribers the option to stream in 320 kb/s using Ogg Vorbis q9 codec.

This certainly will continue to grow Spotify’s popularity and will probably also boost the uptake of premium subscriptions.